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RLS after renal transplant

Clinical bottom line

RLS prevalence after renal transplant is high (24%) in patients with glomerular filtration rate below 15 mL/min.


Reference

MZ Molnar et al. Restless legs syndrome in patients after renal transplantation. American Journal of Kidney Diseases 2004 45: 388-396.

Study

This was a population-based study of all patients at a single transplant unit in Budapest who had received a cadaveric transplant. They were asked to participate in a study of sleep disorders and health-related quality of life. Demographic details were collected, and questionnaires completed on symptoms like insomnia and sleep, restless legs, and quality of life.

Results

Of 1,067 transplant patients, 816 agreed to participate and completely filled the questionnaires.

The prevalence of RLS was 4.8%. There was no difference between patients with and without RLS with regard to age sex, BMI, education, or any other demographic variable. Patients with RLS tended to have more self-reported co-morbidity (3 versus 2 conditions).

RLS prevalence was significantly higher in transplant patients with poor renal function, whose glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was below 15 mL/min (Figure 1). There was no significant difference in RLS with Hb values.

Figure 1: RLS prevalence and glomerular filtration rate

Comment

RLS prevalence after renal transplant is high (24%) in patients with glomerular filtration rate below 15 mL/min.