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Subscribing and more (Editorial)

Subscribing to Bandolier
Defining an agenda
Old chestnuts

Subscribing to Bandolier


Here you will find a subscription form for those of you who wish to continue to receive a monthly print copy of Bandolier when NHS funding ceases after July 2002. By filling in the form and returning it to us, your Bandolier will continue. Health service organisations and charities who can take Bandolier in bulk and distribute it themselves, or those who would like a bulk order for us to distribute, can contact us for preferential rates. The aim will always be to keep costs to the public sector to a minimum.

No print version of Bandolier after July unless you take out a subscription.

Defining an agenda


Frequently-asked question number one when Bandolier takes to the road is how we choose topics for these pages, or what drives the agenda. The agenda is mostly driven by things that crop up, or begin to make sense, or where several bits of evidence come together by serendipity.

Take rheumatoid arthritis, for example. A really difficult topic which has always scrambled our brains, because every talk we sit through seems to add another layer of complex immunology, but not much to therapy or diagnosis. Now we have humanised monoclonal antibodies that can zap the inflammatory process, and mature NICE evidence with clinical outcomes we can just about get our heads around. Added to which a group of clever international rheumatologists provide a readable and sensible discourse on diagnosis and the benefit of early referral. Plus it's all done using high quality evidence methods. It's a gift.

Depression is another difficult topic. A good review of diagnostic methods with diagnostic features and classification lifts the gloom, even if a little. There is something that can be understood by anyone. Together with rheumatoid arthritis, we have two topics to add to a quality service structure that are useful and useable.

Old chestnuts


Complementary therapy, placebo, and odd techniques make up most of Bandolier's questions. So good information that doing nothing doesn't make things happen, that acupuncture doesn't work (this time with cocaine addiction), and a real puzzler over pulsed ultrasound and fracture healing. Statistical significance on tiny numbers is not always a good reason for doing something. The frustration is that no-one is helping us deal with the common situation of too little information.




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